Alzheimer’s Is Increasing Due to The Aging Population in the Coming Decades

Anurag Sharma
Anurag Sharma

Updated · Sep 27, 2023

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According to Alzheimer’s Disease Statistics, Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects the brain, leading to memory loss, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes. It is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for approximately 60-80% of all dementia cases. Alzheimer’s disease typically occurs in older adults, although it can also affect individuals in their 40s or 50s, known as early-onset Alzheimer’s.

Editor’s Choice

  • 5% of people aged 65 to 74 have Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • 13.1% of people aged 75 to 84 have Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • 33.3% of people aged 85 or older have Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • Approximately 6.7 million Americans aged 65 and older are living with Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • Without medical breakthroughs to prevent, slow, or cure the disease, the number of individuals with Alzheimer’s dementia could reach 13.8 million by 2060.
  • Over 11 million family members and unpaid caregivers provided approximately 18 billion hours of care to individuals with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.
  • The value of unpaid dementia caregiving was estimated at $339.5 billion in 2022.
  • Approximately 55 million people will have dementia globally in 2022.
  • By 2030 the number of individuals with dementia is forecasted to increase from 55 million to an estimated number.
  • By 2050 the number of individuals with dementia is expected to reach approximately 139 million worldwide.
Alzheimer's Disease

How common is Alzheimer’s?

  • The mortality rate of Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics has increased by nearly 150% in the past 20 years, with 1 in 3 adults dying from Alzheimer’s or another dementia.
  • In 2020, approximately 5.8 million Americans aged 65 years and older were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • It is estimated that by 2050, the number of people in the United States with Alzheimer’s dementia will reach 12.7 million.
  • Around 11% of people aged 65 years and older, which is approximately 1 in 9 individuals, have Alzheimer’s disease.
  • After reaching the age of 80, approximately 1 in 6 people are estimated to develop Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • Women are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, with nearly two-thirds of diagnosed cases being women. By the age of 65, it is estimated that 1 in 5 women will develop Alzheimer’s.
  • Recent studies indicate that African Americans and Hispanics have a higher risk of Alzheimer’s compared to White people. However, they are less likely to be diagnosed in the United States.

(Source: Alzheimer’s Association)

Education

  • Among individuals with a high school education, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease is 12.7%.
  • Among those with a vocational/trade education, the prevalence is 6.3%.
  • Individuals with some college education have a prevalence rate of 25.4%.
  • Among those with an associate degree, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease is 17.5%.
  • Individuals with a bachelor’s degree have a prevalence rate of 20.9%.
  • Among those with a master’s degree, the prevalence is 15.9%.
  • Individuals with a doctoral degree have the lowest prevalence rate at 1.5%.

Employment Status

  • Among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, 27% are employed.
  • The majority, 69.8%, of individuals with the disease are retired.

Health Condition

  • Among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, 31.8% had diabetes.
  • Hypertension was present in 57.6% of individuals.
  • High cholesterol was reported in 39.4% of individuals with the disease.
  • Only 1.5% of individuals with the disease had a history of stroke.
  • Approximately 9.1% of individuals with the disease also had heart disease.
  • Depression was reported in 7.6% of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevalence and Diagnosis Rates by Race or Ethnicity

African Americans

  • Reported Alzheimer’s disease prevalence rates among African Americans are 14% to 500% higher than among Whites.
  • African Americans are about two times more likely than Whites to have the disease.
  • Prevalence studies in various locations have found higher rates of dementia among African-American elderly compared to Whites and Asians.
  • Prevalence estimates among African Americans have been as high as 56%, although rates of diagnosed disease are more in the range of 5%-16%.
  • An analysis of 2021 Medicare claims data found that older African Americans were more likely than Whites to have a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence rate of 13%.
  • Among those with cognitive impairment, 34% of African Americans have been told by a physician that they have a memory-related disease.

Hispanics

  • Hispanics are about 1.5 times more likely than Whites to have Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Prevalence studies indicate higher rates of dementia among Hispanic elderly compared to Whites and Asians.
  • One study estimated dementia prevalence of 8% among Caribbean Latinos in the 65-74 age group, 28% in the 75-84 age group, and 63% in those aged 85 and older.
  • Mexican-American men have a significantly higher prevalence of cognitive impairment compared to non-Hispanic White men.
  • An analysis of 2021 Medicare claims data found that older Hispanics were more likely than Whites to have a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence rate of 14%.
  • Among those with cognitive impairment, 34% of Hispanics have been told by a physician that they have a memory-related disease.

Alzheimer’s Disease Statistics by Country

United States

  • In the United States, it was estimated that approximately 6.5 million individuals aged 65 or older had the disease in 2022.
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.
  • Around two-thirds of individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in the United States are women.
  • The estimated total cost of Alzheimer’s and other dementias in the United States in 2021 was $355 billion.
  • Approximately 11.3 million family and unpaid caregivers provided 16 billion hours of informal assistance in the United States.
  • The risk of developing Alzheimer’s doubles every five years after the age of 65 in the United States.
  • African Americans have reported Alzheimer’s disease prevalence rates 14% to 500% higher than Whites in the United States.

(Source: Alzheimer’s Association)

United Kingdom

  • In the United Kingdom, it was estimated that around 850,000 people were living with dementia in 2021.
  • Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, is the leading cause of death in the United Kingdom.
  • The annual cost of dementia in the United Kingdom is approximately £34.7 billion.
  • Approximately 700,000 people in the United Kingdom are informal caregivers for someone with dementia.
  • The prevalence of dementia is expected to increase significantly in the United Kingdom due to the aging population.
  • There are regional variations in dementia prevalence, with higher rates observed in certain areas of the United Kingdom.
  • Research suggests that the number of people with dementia in the United Kingdom is projected to reach over 1 million by 2030.
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Anurag Sharma

Anurag Sharma

He has been helping in business of varied scales, with key strategic decisions. He is a specialist in healthcare, medical devices, and life-science, and has accurately predicted the trends in the market. Anurag is a fervent traveller, and is passionate in exploring untouched places and locations. In his free time, he loves to introspect and plan ahead.